Avoid conspicuous consumption, be generous, bless others

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “Command those who are rich in this present world not to be arrogant nor to put their hope in wealth, which is so uncertain, but to put their hope in God, who richly provides us with everything for our enjoyment. Command them to do good, to be rich in good deeds, and to be generous and willing to share. 1 Timothy 6:17-18 (NIV)
 
Our thought for today: “Avoid conspicuous consumption, be generous, bless others”
 
Over the previous two days we’ve been considering the question, “What does it look like to faithfully practice the stewardship principles taught in the Bible, while living a normal life in middle-class America?”  It’s more of a dilemma than we realize. We live in a consumer-oriented culture with a strong bent towards conspicuous consumption. Not just consumption for the sake of meeting our basic needs, and not just consumption that allows for some nice extras, but “conspicuous consumption” – consumption that is compulsive and never satisfied – we’re conditioned for it and pressured into it.
 
This is where the problem lies. This is what Paul warned about in 1 Timothy 6:9 when he wrote, “For the love of money is the root of all evil.” It isn’t money and possessions that are the problem, it’s the “love” of money and possessions. It’s the compulsive pursuit of more and more money, and the conspicuous consumption of goods and services far beyond what is needed, that’s the problem. Getting caught up in this orgy of spending, consuming, and acquiring is exactly what Jesus warned about in Luke 12:15 when He said, “Watch out! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; life does not consist in an abundance of possessions.”
 
Please note that in his instructions for rich people in 1 Timothy 6:17-18 Paul didn’t say or even imply that there’s anything wrong with being rich. He only warned not to let it go to your head, and he commanded that the rich use some of their affluence to do good deeds. He even said that God has allowed us to have what we have and He gives us permission to enjoy it.
 
All of us in middle-class America are “rich” by the standards of the rest of the world. Even if we don’t feel rich by the standards of the USA, our standard of living is the highest in the world. We have better housing, more access to food and clean water, better healthcare, more financial security, better and more reliable social safety nets, more recreational options, and an overall better lifestyle than any other group of middle-class people anywhere in the world. And as was noted in yesterday’s devotional, we don’t have to feel guilty about that and we don’t have to apologize for it, we just need to recognize that with the blessings comes responsibility. God has given us a personal responsibility to use some of what we have to help fund His kingdom-building work on earth and to bless others in need.
 
Tomorrow we will consider one final lesson about our personal responsibility to be good stewards with the financial resources God has entrusted us with. It will be the issue of appropriate levels of giving. How do we determine how much to give and how much is okay to keep and spend on ourselves?
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim
 
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

With the blessings comes responsibility

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “From everyone who has been given much, much will be required; and from the one who has been entrusted with much, even more will be expected.” Luke 12:48 (CSB)
 
Our thought for today: “With the blessings comes responsibility”
 
This morning we will continue our thinking from yesterday about the personal responsibility God has given us to be good stewards of the money, possessions, and resources He has entrusted us with. We ended our discussion yesterday with the question, “What does it look like to faithfully practice the stewardship principles taught in the Bible, while living a normal life in middle-class America?” 
 
For most of us reading this we do in fact live in middle-class America and not in a remote village in the Amazon Jungle, or in a poor town in rural Mexico, or on a farm in the mountains of China. Therefore, our standard of living is different and a different level of resources are required in order to live in this society as opposed to some other. God knows that, and He doesn’t expect us to live in middle-class America as if we were living on a small farm in a distant province in China. Christians are to live in a manner that’s consistent with and appropriate to the place God has put us.
 
But with that said, there are Biblical stewardship principles that do apply. On the one hand, we do not need to feel guilty about or apologize for the blessings God has allowed us to have. On the other hand, we do need to recognize that with the blessings comes responsibility. God hasn’t allowed us to have all that we have just so we can spend it all on ourselves. He has blessed us so we can in-turn be a blessing to others. And the more He has blessed us with, the more He expects us to bless others. Jesus taught that in Luke 12:48, and there are numerous other passages throughout both the Old and New Testaments which teach the same thing. (We’ll look at some of them tomorrow).
 
Our lesson for today is that the more you have the more God expects you to do with it. The giving that matters most to God is sacrificial giving – giving that we feel. However, the more you have the harder it is to do that. If you have ten million dollars and you give away a million, that’s a very generous thing, but you still have nine million. If you have ten thousand dollars and you give away a thousand, that’s more of a sacrifice for you than was the much larger gift from the millionaire.  
 
The Bible doesn’t teach against wealth. Some of the most prominent figures in the Bible were wealthy, including Abraham, David, Barnabas, and some of the women who followed and supported the ministry of Jesus. But the Bible does caution against the dangerous allure of wealth, and it does teach that the more you have, the more God expects you to do with it.
 
Is it okay to have a nice vehicle, or to live in a big home, or to spend money on a luxury vacation? Maybe. If you’re being a faithful and generous giver to the kingdom-building work of God first, if you are a sacrificial giver who regularly blesses others in need, and if after doing so you can still afford a few extra nice things for yourself, good for you. I see nothing in Scripture that teaches otherwise.
 
More about this tomorrow.
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim
 
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

Good stewardship is a personal responsibility

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “For which of you, wanting to build a tower, doesn’t sit down first and calculate the cost to see if he has enough to complete it? Otherwise, after he has laid the foundation and cannot finish it, all the onlookers will begin to ridicule him, saying, “This man started to build and wasn’t able to finish.” Luke 14:28-30 (CSB)
 
Our thought for today: “Good stewardship is a matter of personal responsibility”
 
Last week I placed an order for a new truck. (I have a 3-4 month wait while the factory builds it). Considering what I wrote yesterday about material wealth and spiritual poverty, do you think I’m being hypocritical? Why would I need a new truck? Am I being a good steward of the financial resources the Lord has entrusted me with? Should this even be a spiritual concern? This is actually an important issue for all of us because whether you realize it or not, in some manner, you are faced with the same questions.
 
Let me say first that this was not an impulse purchase. It took a couple of years of thinking, praying, and planning. We did our research, saved our money, took good care of our two existing vehicles so they would be valuable trade-ins, and when we found the right deal, we made our move. Also, Linda and I make it a point to purchase quality vehicles. We take good care of them and then we keep them for a long time. And since that is true, since we do take good care of them and keep them a long time, and since I’m about to turn sixty-eight, this is possibly the last new vehicle I will ever purchase.  
 
So, does that sound like good financial stewardship? Does it sound like we practiced good planning and delayed gratification? I hope it does because that is what we tried to do, and it is the kind of planning and delayed gratification Jesus refers to in Luke 14:28-30.
 
One of the matters of personal responsibility God has revealed to us in the Bible is the issue of financial stewardship. There are approximately 2,350 verses in the Bible which refer to money and possessions. Almost 15% of what Jesus said in the Gospels was related to stewardship. 16 of His 38 parables were about money and possessions. We are to live modestly; be generous; bless others; financially support the work of the church; and provide for our families.
 
But since using our money wisely and in ways that honor the Lord is obviously so important to God, it begs the question about how much is okay to spend on ourselves. Is it okay to buy a new truck, or to live in a big home, or to spend money on an Alaskan cruise? Couldn’t that money be better spent feeding starving children in Africa, or supporting missionaries, or printing Bibles, or a hundred other more “spiritual” uses? What does it look like to faithfully practice the stewardship principles taught in the Bible, while living a normal life in middle-class America?  
 
Hold onto that thought. We’ll come back to it tomorrow. In the meantime, spend some time thinking and praying about the resources God has blessed you with, and how you are using them.
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim
 
 
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

Do you best in all things

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men.” Colossians 3:23 (NIV)
 
Our thought for today: “Do your best in all things”
 
Today is Monday and for many of us it’s the beginning of a new work week. Colossians 3:23 is a verse that many of us use as inspiration and motivation to work hard and to be the best employee we can be, and that is a good application of that verse.
 
But Colossians 3:23 doesn’t just describe an attitude we should have with respect to our work. We should apply it to all aspects of life – including relationships, managing finances, taking care of our health, and more. Our attitude should be that we will do our best and be our best in all areas of life. Most importantly, that should include our spiritual life.
 
Unfortunately, many of us pay more attention to and put more effort into other aspects of life than we do to our spiritual growth. The Bible scholar and author, Os Guinness observed, “The trouble is that as modern people we have too much to live with and too little to live for … In the midst of material plenty, we have spiritual poverty.”
 
Ouch. Yes. Many of us are living in spiritual poverty. We’re doing pretty well in terms of material things, entertainment, physical fitness, finances. We’re doing well in those areas because we apply ourselves to them and work hard at them. But spiritual maturity? Less so. Many are living a life of spiritual poverty because we just don’t give it the same attention and the same effort as we do the rest of life.
 
This morning I want to encourage all of us to think deeply and prayerfully about Paul’s instruction in Colossians 3:23 as it applies to our spiritual lives. Then, ask God to show you if you need to do a better job of practicing your faith. We should give our best effort to all areas of life, but especially to being a good disciple of Christ.
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim  
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

Are there too many excuses?

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “Be doers of the word, not hearers only …” James 1:22 (CSB)
 
Our thought for today: “Are there too many excuses?”
 
Okay, one more story from A.J. Jacobs and his year of living Biblically. Rather than quoting the story verbatim, I’ll paraphrase it for you. One of the Biblical commands A.J. was struggling to obey was the stoning of adulterers. First of all, how do you identify one? And second, could he get away with stoning them? Isn’t it against the law? Wouldn’t they put him in jail? Being obsessive/compulsive, and being fully committed to this business of following the Bible as literally as possible, he was seriously bothered that he might not get to stone an adulterer.
 
However, A.J. is nothing if not resourceful, and the more he studied the problem the more he realized it might not be hopeless after all. For one thing, the Bible doesn’t stipulate how big the stones have to be, so he wondered if perhaps pebbles would qualify as stones. His team of Old Testament counselors (including a couple of ultra-orthodox Jews) agreed that technically pebbles are stones. So, A.J. got himself a little pouch full of pebbles. Now, to find some adulterers.
 
One day he was walking in Central Park in his robe and sandals, with his staff, long hair, unkept beard, and pouch of pebbles. He stopped to rest on a bench. On the other end of the bench was a grumpy old man who looked like the cartoon character Mr. Magoo. The guy appraised A.J. and snarled, “What are you, some kind of a nut?” A.J. said, “No, I’m just trying to follow the Bible as literally as possible.” The man considered that for a moment then noticed the pouch in A.J.’s hands. “What’s in the bag?” the man asked. “Stones”, A.J. replied. “What’re they for?”, Mr. Magoo wanted to know. “They’re to stone adulterers” A. J. admitted. “You’re throwing stones at adulterers?” “Yes”, A.J. said. “Well, I’m an adulterer!” Mr. Magoo declared. At that news A.J. perked up and eagerly responded, “Are you really? Could I stone you? You would really be helping me if you would let me stone you.” “If you try to, I’ll punch you in the mouth!” Mr. Magoo threatened.
 
A.J. was in something of a panicked quandary. He didn’t want to get in a fight but he couldn’t afford to let this opportunity pass either. So, without giving it much more thought, A.J. quickly stood up, extracted a pebble from the bag, flicked it at Mr. Magoo, hitting him in the chest, and then ran away, leaving Mr. Magoo shouting curses and shaking his fist. Thinking about it later, A.J. felt bad about picking on a grumpy old man in Central Park, but on the other hand, he did get to stone an adulterer.
 
That’s a funny story but there’s actually a lesson in it for us. A.J. was so serious about his quest to obediently comply with Scripture that he refused to let circumstances or obstacles stop him. Instead of making excuses, he found ways to overcome the obstacles and to follow the Bible. A.J. did it for the sake of a book contract. What if we would make half as much effort for the sake of following Jesus?
 
Is it possible we’re a little too quick to make excuses rather than going all in and making the extra effort? Just some food for thought.
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim
 
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

I’ll do my job and you do yours

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “A manifestation of the Spirit is given to each person for the common good …” 1 Corinthians 12:7 (CSB)
 
Our thought for today: “I’ll do my job and you do yours”
 
This morning I want to bring us back to the story of A.J. Jacobs and his year of living Biblically, as recorded in his funny book, “The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible”.
 
Since A.J. was following the Bible from Genesis to Revelation, two-thirds of his year was spent living in the Old Testament and one-third in the New. As you would guess, living in the New Testament was a lot easier for him than was the Old Testament, but still, it had its moments. One such moment occurred when he got to Mark 16:17-18 and he read, “And these signs will accompany those who believe: they will drive out demons; they will speak in new tongues; they will pick up snakes …”
 
That last part really stumped him. He wondered if he was supposed to go around picking up deadly snakes. So, he consulted his team of New Testament counselors and he was amazed to discover that there’s a fringe sect of Christianity that actually does practice snake handling as part of their worship services. Intrigued, A.J. jumped on a plane, flew from New York City to Knoxville, TN, rented a car, drove ninety minutes to the little town of Del Rio, and met with Pastor Jimmy Morrow of “The Church of God with Signs to Follow”.
 
Jimmy was thrilled to have A.J. visit and he was eager to tell him all about snake handling. He even invited A.J. to attend their worship service, which A.J. found to be excessively long but also disappointing because so few people attended, only six. He asked Pastor Jimmy about the low attendance. Jimmy told him that six was about normal but sometimes nobody shows up. “But I preach anyway.” Jimmy said. A.J. was confused and responded, “Wait, you preach anyway, even if there’s nobody here?” To which Pastor Jimmy responded, “Sure. My job is to preach, their job is to show up, and I’m going to do my job whether they do theirs or not!”
 
Jimmy went on to tell a story: “One time nobody showed up. I still go up on the pulpit and preach. And this guy walking by, he stuck his head in and said, “What are you doing? No one’s here. No one can hear you.’ And I said, ‘Well you heard me, didn’t you?”
 
What a great lesson for a preacher! I like that and I’m going to adopt it as my own attitude, “My job is to preach. Your job is to show up. And I’m going to do my job whether you do yours or not!” Who woulda thunk I would learn a helpful preacher-lesson from a backwoods snake handling Pentecostal preacher recorded in a book written by an obsessive /compulsive secular Jew – but there it is.
 
So, we’re gonna have church this Sunday at Oak Hill Baptist (with signs to follow). There won’t be any snake handling but there will be lots of preaching. Y’all come now, ya’hear?
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

How hard do we really try?

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.” Romans 12:2 (NIV)
 
Our thought for today: “How hard do we really try?
 
A couple of months ago my brother sent me a book as a gift. The title is “The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible.” It was written by A.J. Jacobs. A.J. is not a Christian, he’s a secular Jew. In other words, he’s Jewish by heritage but he doesn’t practice the faith. He makes his living as a writer for Esquire Magazine and he’s also the author of couple of quirky but funny books. Oh, and he’s obsessive /compulsive to a high degree (hold that thought).
 
The idea behind A.J.’s book is that he decided he would spend an entire year attempting to follow the Bible as literally as possible. And I do mean literally. He began in Genesis, found every command and instruction in the entire Bible, and then he tried to follow it as best he could. He let his hair and beard grow untrimmed for a year. He wore white robes and sandals. He carried a ten-string harp everywhere he went. He observed the dietary laws of Leviticus, tithed, burned incense, stoned adulterers (this was funny), and much more. He did it all, for a year, while living in New York City, in a small apartment with his wife and toddler son, and taking the bus and subway to work every day at Esquire Magazine.
 
Remember, A.J. is obsessive/compulsive. He pays excruciating attention to detail – excessively so, and that’s the focus he brought to his year of living Biblically. He’s also a clever and funny writer and so his daily descriptions of his adventures are often hilarious. Probably the funniest involved the Levitical laws regarding menstruating women. In the Old Testament, menstruating women are considered impure. Therefore, they’re required to quarantine themselves for the duration of their monthly cycle. Additionally, any chair they sit in during this time is also impure and cannot be sat in by anyone else.
 
A.J.’s wife Julie is quite a character too and although she sort-of went along with his Bible project, she messed with him a lot too – just for fun, and this stuff about menstruating women was one step too far for her.
 
One day, when A.J. came home from a long day at work, he fell into his favorite chair. After a moment Julie said, “I started my period today, and I sat in that chair.” A.J. immediately jumped up and moved to another chair. Julie then said, “I sat in that one too.” Again, he popped up, snapped at her in frustration, and moved to another chair. She waited a moment and said, “That one too.” It turned out that before A.J. came home Julie intentionally sat in every chair in the house, making them all impure, and leaving him no chair he could sit in. The entire book is like that – one episode after another of A.J.’s quest to live as Biblically as possible, and much of it is very funny.
 
Our daily devotional today is less serious than most of the others, and yet there’s an important point for us to consider: “How hard to we really try to live Biblically?” A.J.’s year-long quest was extreme, and done for the wrong reasons (a book contract), and yet, he was on to something.
 
As the people of God, we’re called to conform less to the patterns and habits of the world (Romans 12:2), and more to the guidelines for living God has given us in the Bible. But how hard do we try to do that? How much effort do we really put in to it?
 
We’ll come back to A.J.’s story tomorrow and think about this a little more.
 
God Bless,
Pastor Jim
 
 
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

Pray for others

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “As for me, I vow that I will not sin against the Lord by ceasing to pray for you. I will teach you the good and right way.” 1 Samuel 12:23 (CSB)
 
Our thought for today: “Pray for others”
 
I have always admired Samuel, the leader in ancient Israel in the days before and during the reign of King Saul. Over the course of his long life, Samuel served in every major leadership role that was available to a Jewish man of his day including seer, priest, judge, prophet, and military leader.
 
But it was his commitment as the spiritual leader of the nation that to me is the most impressive and inspiring. As we read in 1 Samuel 12:23 (above), he felt a personal responsibility before the Lord to pray for the people and to teach them God’s ways. That’s an example that every pastor, preacher, teacher, and Christian leader should strive to emulate.
 
In yesterday’s devotional we thought about the personal responsibility God has given us to pray for ourselves. There are too many examples in the Bible of people praying for themselves for us to ignore. God obviously wants us to do that. But there are also many verses which call us to pray for others (intercessory prayer). 1 Samuel 12:23 is just one example of a leader who was committed to regularly praying for the people God had entrusted to him. The Apostle Paul felt that way too: “For this reason, since the day we heard this, we haven’t stopped praying for you.” (Colossians 1:9)
 
But this call to pray for others pertains to all of us, it’s not just for leaders. In James 5:16 we read, “Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is very powerful in its effect.”
 
In 1 Timothy 2:1 Paul wrote, “First of all, then, I urge that petitions, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgiving be made for everyone …” In Matthew 5:44 Jesus even told us to pray for our enemies, “But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” And in Romans 8:26 Paul told us that the Holy Spirit even helps us to pray, “In the same way the Spirit also helps us in our weakness, because we do not know what to pray for as we should, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with unspoken groanings”
 
Does your church have regularly scheduled group prayer meetings? I hope it does. And if so, do you attend them? I hope you do. At Oak Hill Baptist we meet for prayer at 8:30 on Sunday mornings and at 6:00 on Wednesday evenings. We would love to have you join us.
 
God calls us to pray for others. He has made it a matter of personal responsibility.
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim
 
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

Pray for yourself

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “Create in me a pure heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me.” Psalm 51:10 (NIV)
 
Our thought for today: “Pray for yourself”
 
I have a book about prayer called “All the Prayers of the Bible”. It was published in 1959 by Dr. Herbert Lockyer and over the next twenty years had to be reprinted twelve times in order to meet the demand and to fill all the orders.
 
In the book Dr. Lockyer records and then comments on every prayer in the Bible, beginning with Genesis 4:26, “At that time men began to call on the name of the Lord”, and ending with Revelation 22:20, “Come, Lord Jesus”.
 
There are more than 650 prayers in the Bible with over 450 recorded answers. Knowing that is helpful and instructive. Evidently prayer matters to God. Apparently, He wants us to pray or He wouldn’t have given us so many examples of it. God has made prayer a matter of personal responsibility for us. He calls us to pray; He teaches us to pray; He gives us hundreds of examples of prayer; He listens when we pray; and He answers our prayers.
 
Interestingly, of all the subjects the pray-ers in the Bible could have addressed in their prayers, one of the most frequent is themselves. Very often the pray-er is praying for him or herself. This is helpful to know because too often we accept the false notion that it’s selfish to pray for ourselves. That’s simply not true. In fact, as David modeled for us in Psalm 51:10, prayer is often when God does a lot of the molding and shaping in our lives. During our prayer times God is busy shaping, changing, and refining our heart.
 
The Christian life is lived from the inside out. What’s true of the heart will be true of the person. When a person spends long periods in deep prayer asking God to change his or her heart, the results of that prayer will show itself in outward ways in things like love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control (Galatians 5:22-23). That’s the outward evidence of a rich inward prayer life and it’s what David was praying for in Psalm 51:10.
 
In the Bible God has revealed to us that prayer, for ourselves, is not only needed, it’s a matter of personal responsibility. We need to do this for ourselves. I encourage you to spend some time today praying for yourself.
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.

Be a reason people come to church

Good morning everyone,
 
Our theme for this month: “Personal Responsibility”
 
Our Bible verse for today: “How good and pleasant it is when brothers live together in harmony!” Psalm 133:1 (CSB)
 
Our thought for today: “Be a reason people come to church”
 
Today is Monday, how was your Sunday? Did you remember the lessons from our recent daily devotionals and did you practice them? For instance, did you fulfill your personal responsibility to attend the gathering of your church? Remember, your church needs you to be there.
 
If you were there, did you fulfill your personal responsibility to encourage, bless, and serve others? All of us have been given spiritual gifts, talents, skills, abilities, and resources that God intends for us to use to bless others and to help with His kingdom-building work. Did you do your part? Did you help?
 
Finally, did you fulfill your personal responsibility to protect the unity of your church? It’s up to each of us to be thick-skinned and not easily offended; and we are to be agents of peace rather than taking offense and bickering. Most things are not a big deal and therefore should not be made into big deals.
 
A healthy church family gathered together, with everyone fulfilling their personal responsibilities to make and keep the church healthy, is a joyful and spiritually nurturing experience. That’s what David was describing in Psalm 133:1 (above). He was writing about the community of faith and what a wonderful thing it is when God’s people get along with each other. That’s why David was also able to write, in Psalm 122:1, “I rejoiced with those who said to me, ‘Let us go to the house of the Lord.’” David loved going to church! And so should we.
 
When I began this series about personal responsibility, I noted that the issues we would think about this month were all matters of personal responsibility for us because God has revealed in the Bible that He has made them our responsibility. Therefore, I suggested we should each select a few and turn them into New Years resolutions that we would work on in the coming year.
 
Today’s topic from Psalm 133:1 would be a great goal to work on this year. Decide to be a source of blessing, peace, and harmony in your church – a person others love to be around. How wonderful if you were a reason people wanted to go to church! They don’t want to miss church because they don’t want to miss seeing you. That’s not taking anything away from Jesus. Quite the contrary. It would be evidence of Jesus working in you and through you to bless others.
 
Will you make it one of your resolutions this year to be a reason people want to be in your church?
 
God bless,
Pastor Jim 
 
Copyright © 2022 Oak Hill Baptist Church, All rights reserved.